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welcome to the hellmouth

+21
+los angeles
+yeah

i can’t believe i’m seeing him in like 2 weeks 

myuntreatedstate:

Yo what the fuck happened to Keaton Henson that his songs are perfectly suited to a show about traumatized queer zombies in a bleak post-apocalyptic rural northern english village i s2g keaton r u okay

i’m looking thru the national sex offender registry (idk ok) and there’s a child molester/rapist living on my street at school yep good to know thanks nsopw.gov

"he was white but the name on his card was interesting…zuhkari"

my mom learned today that zachary is a real name that white ppl have

youcantkilltheboogeyman:

my band just released our first EP, “ask me nicely.”
it’s been a long time coming, and would mean the world to us if you would give it a listen. thank you!
here are links to our bandcamp and twitter

LISTEN

youcantkilltheboogeyman:

my band just released our first EP, “ask me nicely.”

it’s been a long time coming, and would mean the world to us if you would give it a listen. thank you!

here are links to our bandcamp and twitter

LISTEN

The ubiquitous forms of address for women ‘Mrs’ and ‘Miss’ are both abbreviations of ‘mistress’. Although mistress is a term with a multiplicity of meanings, in early modern England the mistress most commonly designated the female equivalent of master–that is, a person with capital who directed servants or apprentices.

Prior to the mid eighteenth century, there was only Mrs (or Mris, Ms, or other forms of abbreviation). Mrs was applied to any adult woman who merited the social distinction, without any marital connotation. Miss was reserved for young girls until the mid eighteenth century. Even when adult single women started to use Miss, Mrs still designated a social or business standing, and not the status of being married, until at least the mid nineteenth century.

This article demonstrates the changes in nomenclature over time, explains why Mrs was never used to accord older single women the same status as a married woman, and argues that the distinctions are important to economic and social historians.

Abstract from Mistresses and Marriage: or, a Short History of the Mrs, also known as the most interesting article I’ve read all day.

Full text is available here, but if you remember one thing, how about that Jane Austen in 1811 is the earliest citation that the author can find for the “Mrs Man” form, e.g. “Mrs John Dashwood”? 

(via allthingslinguistic)

just-a-mean-teen:

My anaconda will take whatever it can get at this point

(via attributesofsummer)

80slove:

80’s Malls

(via youcantkilltheboogeyman)

(via awr-y)

1000drawings:

by Kevin Lucbert

youcantkilltheboogeyman replied to your post:saying something stupid and then cringing abt it…

Every day of my fucking life

i actually thought of u after posting this LOL

saying something stupid and then cringing abt it in bed every night for the rest of ur life

(via saydist)